Hardware

SanDisk SD card can store data for 100 years

SanDisk on Wednesday announced a Secure Digital card that can store data for 100 years, but can be written on only once. The WORM (write once, read many) card is "tamper proof" and data cannot be altered or deleted, SanDisk said in a statement. The card is designed for long-time preservation of crucial data like legal documents, medical files and forensic evidence, SanDisk said.

The media comes with capacity of only 1GB. SanDisk determined the media's 100-year data-retention lifespan based on internal tests conducted at normal room temperatures.

To draw comparisons, the card is like DVD-write only media, but much smaller and with a much longer life span.

SD cards typically slot into portable devices like digital cameras and mobile phones to store or move images, video or other data. The WORM works like conventional SD media, but only with compatible devices, SanDisk said.

The company said it is shipping the media in volume to the Japanese police force to archive images as an alternative to film, SanDisk said. The company is working with a number of consumer electronics companies including camera vendors to support the media.

The media is available worldwide through resellers. SanDisk did not comment on pricing.

link Source: MSFN

FCC set to reconsider broadband regulations

hardwareFederal regulators are reconsidering the rules that govern high-speed Internet connections - wading into a bitter policy dispute that could be tied up in court for years.

The Federal Communications Commission is scheduled to vote Thursday to begin taking public comments on three different paths for regulating broadband. That includes a proposal by FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski, a Democrat, to define broadband access as a telecommunications service subject to "common carrier" obligations to treat all traffic equally.

Genachowski's proposal is a response to a federal appeals court ruling that has cast doubt on the agency's authority over broadband under its existing regulatory framework.

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Seagate Introduces New Era Of External Storage

hardwareSeagate, the worldwide leader in hard drives and storage solutions, today introduced the next evolution of the company's award-winning FreeAgent external hard drives—its new GoFlex storage solutions. This new family of external drives and accessories introduces a new level of flexibility to traditional USB 2.0 storage that will change the way people store, access, enjoy and share their digital content.

The FreeAgent GoFlex storage family includes easy, plug-and-play portable and desktop drives, with an array of interchangeable cables and desktop adapters that allow each drive to adapt to the interface or device being used. GoFlex hard disk drives are also specially designed to provide interoperability between operating systems in order to work with both Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X computers.

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Turn Your iPad Into a Netbook With ClamCase

appleDo you type enough on your iPad that you can make the case for a keyboard, but don't want to lug around a separate input device? ClamCase might have your answer: the first iPad case designed with an integrated keyboard. While there's no set ship date, much less a price, ClamCase has managed to design a pretty slick housing for the iPad. A video rendering of the case shows how it can be used in laptop mode, or in a tablet setting with the top portion folded backward.

There's no official word on availability yet; ClamCase claims it'll ship "later this year," whatever that means. Their website is currently being Slashdotted, so everyone's in the dark regarding pricing and shipping until they manage to recover from the deluge of Apple fans trying to find out about even more cases for their beloved iPads.

What will this case be like to use? Will it be awkward to reach up and touch the screen instead of having a traditional touchpad or pointing stick built into the case? Let us know what you think in the comments.

link Source: PC World

Corsair Launches Outrageously Fast GTX 2533MHz DDR3 Memory

hardwareCorsair, a worldwide supplier of high-performance PC components, today announced the launch of the Dominator® GTX4, a new ultra-high-speed module with operation guaranteed up to 2533 MHz. These modules are available immediately, in limited quantity, from the Corsair Online Store.

Producing modules that perform at these extraordinary speeds requires an extremely meticulous, manual screening process, and each module represents the fastest thirty-two RAMs out of literally thousands of candidates. Each RAM chip is individually screened and graded for performance.

The top few percent are set aside for assembly onto GTX4 modules, the balance are returned to normal manufacturing. Modules are then carefully assembled using these premium ICs, and only the fastest make the GTX grade.

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Intel delays USB 3 chipsets until 2012

intelIntel announced it will wait an additional year before adopting the newer, faster USB 3.0 format by delaying the format’s motherboard chipset.

This recent news announcement will likely only anger some of Intel’s OEM partners, as the companies look to try and integrate USB 3.0 support into new product lineups.

The USB 3.0 format was first introduced in November 2008, but many people doubted the industry-wide demand for such a format.  In 2009, some PCs announced they’ll release USB 3.0 products, but very few were released.  Since then, more companies have launched USB 3.0 chipsets, HDDs, and other devices using the preceding USB 2.0 technology.

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Micro USB to have huge breakthroughs in 2010

usbTo cut down on electronic waste and increase interoperability, ten mobile phone makers have signed a European Commission Memorandum of Understanding that commits them to using Micro USB as their standard mobile phone charger and data connection by 2010.

Many of the companies that signed the agreement, which include Apple, LG, Motorola, NEC, Nokia, Qualcomm, Research in Motion, Samsung, Sony Ericsson, and Texas Instruments, are members of the OMTP Forum which agreed on standardizing micro USB for charging and local data exchange last February.

"I am very pleased that industry has found an agreement, which will make life much simpler for consumers," said EC Vice President Günter Verheugen, "I am also very pleased that this solution was found on the basis of self-regulation."

Micro USB is already found in a number of popular devices, such as Amazon's Kindle, and differs from the commonly found Mini USB standard because it allows mobile devices to be connected to each other without the need for a host computer.

link Source: Betanews

Interop panel: Finally finalizing 802.11n

hardwareYou may think the 802.11n Wi-Fi networking standard is already here. The fact is, equipment manufacturers have been relying on drafts. At last, the final draft is on its way, and an Interop panel discussed its implications Wednesday.

The now emerging IEEE 802.11n Wi-Fi standard will add some major new twists to Wi-Fi, or in many cases, finalize some of the twists manufacturers have already begun implementing while waiting for the finalized draft. Some of the most important of these changes will include three modes of operation and two frequency ranges, speakers said at the Interop conference here Wednesday.

Although the IEEE has not yet approved the final 802.11n standard, some wireless devices, such as routers, are already available that comply with the emerging specification.

The three modes of operation encompass "802.11n only, 802.11b/g only, and mixed mode," noted Paul DeBeasi, a senior analyst at the Burton Group. The standard also supports both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequency ranges.

link Source: BetaNews

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