Tagged: security

The Implications of “Endpoint Protection: Attitudes and Opinions”

The Implications of “Endpoint Protection: Attitudes and Opinions”

Bromium has just published the results of “Endpoint Protection: Attitudes and Opinions,” a survey of more than 300 information security professionals, focused on end user threats and security. The majority of the respondents believe: Existing security solutions are unable to stop endpoint infections, Anti-virus is unable to stop advanced targeted attacks and End users are their biggest security headache.

Third-party programs add to PC vulnerabilities

Third-party programs add to PC vulnerabilities

We reported earlier this week on how financial organizations are at risk from third parties with compromised security. It seems that the same thing applies to software. The latest review by IT security specialist Secunia shows that third-party programs are responsible for 76 percent of the vulnerabilities discovered in the 50 most popular programs in 2013. Secunia's review looks at the top 50 programs...

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Throw out those bad passwords

California-based password management software specialist SplashData has released the results of its annual list of the internet’s worst passwords. For the first time “password” has been knocked off the number one slot. This doesn’t mean people are getting more security minded, however, as it’s been replaced by the equally obvious “123456”. SplashData compiles the list from files containing stolen passwords posted online during the...

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Canonical “abused trademark law” to target a site critical of Ubuntu privacy

Canonical, the maker of Ubuntu, has been fending off criticism from privacy advocates because the desktop search tool in recent versions of the operating system also searches the Internet. That means if you're searching your desktop for a file or application, you might also see results from Amazon or other websites. One person who dislikes Canonical's search tool is Micah Lee, a technologist at...

AI firm Vicarious cracks CAPTCHAs

AI firm Vicarious cracks CAPTCHAs

CAPTCHA are a thorn in the side of web users. Those almost indecipherable string of letters and numbers that are meant to help websites determine that you are a human rather than a spambot often cause more frustration for users than anything else, and they have now been cracked. Vicarious, a California-based AI team, reveals that it has been able to develop algorithms that...

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Recent Lunarsoft Updates

There have been several updates to Lunarsoft recently. These updates cover every part of Lunarsoft from the Wiki to the Frontpage and the Forums as well. Several minor issues were identified recently and resolved. The updates and issues identified are as follows: Frontpage: Several of the extensions used for the Frontpage website have been updated. Security update has been applied. Automated news posting to...

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Facebook accused of deceiving developers over security

Facebook has been accused of deceiving developers after it emerged that the social networking site did nothing to verify the security of applications it was paid tens of thousands of dollars to review, and which it assured users had been checked. It is believed Facebook was paid up to $95,000 (£60,600) by developers whose applications were entered into its verified apps scheme. The system...

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A look back at Microsoft’s 2011 security landscape

Decrease in Critical Issues and Bulletins As far as individual issues, Critical-class CVEs accounted for less than a third of the issues we addressed in bulletin releases for the first time since we began our monthly bulletin-release cadence in 2004. And in absolute numbers, Critical-class CVEs are at their lowest levels since 2005. The fact that we’re seeing lower percentages of Critical issues and...

Fading data could improve privacy

Fading data could improve privacy

Privacy could be enhanced if data was allowed to fade, suggests research. Dutch researcher Dr Harold van Heerde is looking into ways to gradually “degrade” the information that sites gather about visitors. Slowly swapping details for more general information can help guard against accidental disclosure, he said.

Traditional antivirus will die in the next two years

Traditional antivirus will die in the next two years

For the vast majority of users, at least, the current model of paying for and installing separate online security software products for each device, OS and transaction environment is on the way out. It has to die. Why? Look at the way the kids use Google, and then look to the future. Increasingly, users expect to be able to communicate and transact across a...